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Legal Leisure

The legality of recreational marijuana rises in 2018

Lynnya Simmons, Staff Reporter

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The use of recreational and medicinal marijuana has been growing rapidly in the United States in the past few years. Being the most used illicit drug in the U.S., its newfound legalization is bound to cause an uproar for both parties who are against and for the legalization of Marijuana. On January 1, 2018, by voters’ approval, Proposition 64 was passed in California, creating a system of selling and the usage of marijuana both medicinal and recreational. The state of California has joined eight other states and the District of Columbia in legalizing the recreational use of Marijuana, becoming the largest state in distribution. With its new freedom also comes a span of new laws. According to ABC News, marijuana is gonna be treated like alcohol with its laws. Once recreational anyone 21 or older can carry up to an ounce of cannabis and can grow up to six plants in their own home. California residents are prohibited from smoking in public, and it’s also against the law to use it near school grounds and around any daycare centers. Driving while under the influence of Marijuana is also an offense and is prohibited by the state.

In 2012, Colorado and Washington had the nation’s attention when residents of both states made a decision of legalizing recreational marijuana to people over the age of 21. Making history for becoming the first states to take notion in the legalization. Marijuana has been criminalized for decades and still is in more conservative states. The state of Missouri has yet to legalize the usage of Marijuana statewide. Although continuing to maintain their firm laws against cannabis, a proposition helped decriminalize the drug in the state. In January 2017, the state of Missouri made it a law that if carrying less than 10 grams of marijuana, the punishment would be a criminal misdemeanor instead of jail time. Missouri could be the next state to follow in California’s steps, with the possibility of medical marijuana showing up on the ballots for voters in the year 2018.

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